6 Digital Health Predictions for 2022

Last Updated: June 14, 2022 By

Digital health is becoming more and more popular, which will help to grow the industry in 2022. The digital world has become an integral part of our lives with healthcare taking up 17% (or $719 billion worth per year on US GDP alone. But we can’t forget about all its benefits! It’s scary how many people were left out during this pandemic time period because they didn’t know what was happening or where their next meal would come from; thankfully there are startups working hard every day trying to bring access back into society by creating innovative ways for everyone regardless if you’re rich or not.

I reached out these high profile tech investors across the United States and Europe about the expected technology trends and their predictions.

#1 EHR will be Dominating in various Healthcare Sectors

Divya Dugar is a Market Analyst at SelectHub

The potential of EHRs is only limited by a provider’s imagination. These systems can be used as an all-inclusive medical Records Sharing Network, allowing patients and providers alike access to their health records from anywhere at any time no matter what type or setting they are in. Specially, EMR for small practices can create comprehensive & advanced practice management system to provide high quality patient care.

In the future, experts predict that there will be significant improvements in patient engagement and accessibility. These technologies have been proven as a way for providers to streamline workflow while still providing instant access at any given moment throughout your day or night – something which benefits both you and us!

#2 The mobile phone will be the new go-to for when you need an emergency on-call care team

Kristin Baker Spohn, General Partner at CRV

The pandemic has been a catalyst for digital adoption and healthcare will be no exception. I predict that by 2021, there are certain areas where we can expect this trend to strengthen:

Digital natives seek out solutions wherever they go. The healthcare industry is eager to meet these needs due in part from increased patient expectations. With most people now having some level of chronic condition like diabetes or heart disease – what’s wrong goes viral before you know it!

AI and machine learning are transforming the way providers do practice in the past. AI-powered software like Viz.ai, which performs medical imaging on mobile phones to reduce time it takes for stroke victims treatment is likely going to continue thriving in 2021 as a result of its ability increase clinical teams productivity while also relieving strain from staff members’ workloads – all at no cost!

#3 The use of virtual and augmented reality will be more popular in treating surgeries

Lomax Ward, Cofounder and General Partner at Luminous Ventures

With new technology and treatments on a daily basis, we’re all learning more about how we can be healthy in ways never before imaginable! Virtual Reality (VR) headsets like Oculus Rift CV1 or Microsoft Hololens come at low costs which make it possible for anyone with an interest to try them out without breaking their bank account. These devices are proving themselves to be effective at treating patients, while also reducing costs for payers by keeping them out of hospitals instead. Moreover, remote healthcare offering helps patients to save both cost and time.

The market for virtual reality-based treatments, such as those offered by Oxford VR or Karuna Labs that are specifically tailored towards mental health conditions and chronic pain management. According to a report, it could grow over 15x from $2 billion in 2019 to an estimated 34 billion dollars within the next decade.

#4 Homecare will becoming more and more popular, with the option of telemedicine

Annie Case, Principal at Kleiner Perkins

The homecare industry is growing. Technology and telemedicine are providing hope for an affordable, high quality of life without having to leave your home or country!

Home care will soon move beyond basic levels in order to provide specialized services for patients’ specific needs surrounding medical treatments at their own location or homes.

– This means that people can get professional assistance right when they need it!

The COVID-19 pandemic brought telemedicine out of obscurity and into the spotlight, as patients accessed care from their homes with a virtual visit for the first time.

Many care needs require face-to face interaction between physicians and patients, and many providers wish they had more patient’s information risking social distancing factors due to COVID19.

#5 Clinical outcomes will be financially optimized to enhance ROI

Yumin Choi, Partner at Bain Capital Ventures

I’m excited to see the development of a new market trend which merges clinical and financial outcomes. This has long been seen as rather basic, but until now these two factors have largely operated independently in healthcare world. An instance, try to find out the of cost of anything in healthcare sector and you’ll see the overwhelming number of answers.

As doctors across all specialties continue striving for higher quality patient outcomes while also being mindful about costs in terms of money spent per case as well as how those funds are raised from insurers/government programs. There has been some controversy surrounding whether more emphasis should be placed solely onto clinical metrics like mortality rates versus administrative ones.

In order to maintain a sustainable healthcare system, it is important that both clinicians and payers prioritize financial ROI. The days of only focusing on one or the other will not work- they must be tied together through value based care initiatives if we want our future generations’ wellbeing guaranteed.

As doctors across all specialties continue striving for higher quality patient outcomes while also being mindful about costs in terms of money spent per case as well as how those funds are raised from insurers/government programs. There has been some controversy surrounding whether more emphasis should be placed solely onto clinical metrics like mortality rates versus administrative ones.

#6: Chronic and complex diseases will be treated with digital solutions

Cheryl Cheng, Founder and General Partner at Vive Ventures

2022 will be a year of big changes for the healthcare industry. The economic climate, along with increased access to care through at-home diagnostics and treatment options have forced us all into new thinking about what “quality” means.

We need solutions on how to integrate pure digital technologies like wearables or e-Health platforms as we move forward from 2022 onwards, so they don’t hinder rather help those who use it most effectively in various conditions such as doctor’s offices during meetings etc.

For example, with the rise of technology and mobile phones we might see a high number in mental health services, and the services will get more specific gender, age and demographics. And doctors will be also able to treat more chronic disease such as cancer care.

Average rating 5 / 5. Vote count: 1

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.